When Bullies Intentionally Harm Wildlife

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If while driving you encounter geese or other wildlife crossing the road, give them the right-of-way or risk a fine of $1,000 and six months in jail. (USFWS photo)

Question: I live in an over-55 community in Rio Vista. There are wild turkeys here and Canada geese, which many of us love. Last month someone deliberately ran into turkeys crossing a road to go to their roosting trees. A man who went out every evening to watch them “fly up” saw a car actually speed up to hit them. The driver floored the accelerator and plowed into them instead of slowing down to let them pass. Six were killed. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) was called, and presumably never caught the guy.

A few days ago a golfer in a golf cart plowed into a bunch of geese crossing the golf path. He hit and injured one. The golfer didn’t stop. A woman walking her dog saw it happen and confronted the golfer who said, “Well, the geese shouldn’t be crossing the path.” Yesterday on a main road outside the community a turkey and babies were crossing; eyewitnesses said that instead of slowing down, a car sped up and killed at least the parent.

Many people here are very upset by bullies in vehicles intentionally killing innocent animals. I am making a flier that will go to people on the Nextdoor community email. I want to tell what the legality is about deliberately killing a wild turkey or Canada goose and what the possible consequences might be. I can’t seem to find a clear answer yet and was hoping you could help. (Judith A.)

Answer: Scenarios like you are describing are very disturbing and constitute several violations. The use of a vehicle to take turkeys or geese violates the law because vehicles are not a lawful method of take (California Code of Regulations Title 14, sections 311 (Upland Game/Turkey) and 507 (Migratory Birds/Geese)). Pursuing, driving, herding or taking any bird or mammal from any type of motor-driven vehicle is also prohibited (CCR Title 14, section 251). In addition, no person shall harass, herd or drive any game or non-game birds (CCR Title 14, section 251.1). Violations of Fish and Game Code and Title 14 regulations such as these are generally punishable as misdemeanors, with fines of up to $1,000 and six months in jail (see FGC, section 12002 (a)).

Hopefully, you will not encounter these types of situations again, but if you do try to collect as many details as you can including vehicle type, license plate number, date and time. Then call the 24-hour CalTIP hotline at (888) 334-2258 or send an anonymous text to 847411 (tip411). In the message, text CALTIP followed by a space and then the information. You can even send photos. Remember, you can remain anonymous and may receive an award for your efforts.


How to find “What’s Open and What’s Closed” in ocean waters?
Question: I’ve spent hours on the CDFW website trying to find the season and take limits for halibut. Can you please tell me if you know the answer? (Richard G., Redondo Beach)

Answer: Yes! And next time you have a question like this, here’s the first and best place to check: http://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Regulations/Fishing-Map. This is a great resource, so please bookmark this page! You will find a clickable map of California here. Just click on the portion of the state (along the coast) where you’d like to fish and a list will pop up of exactly what’s open and what’s closed in that area. Then, if you click on the species you’re interested in, you will be provided with the basic fishing regulations and requirements for that species.

In your case, since you are from Redondo Beach and are wondering about California halibut, just click on that location and you will find the following information will immediately pop up:

  • California halibut: The recreational fishery for California halibut (Paralichthys californicus) remains open year-round. The daily bag and possession limit is five fish south of Point Sur, Monterey County. The minimum size limit is 22 inches total length.

In addition, if you click on “California halibut” in this reference, you will find a hot link that will take you to an informational page that will provide you with additional life history information and interesting facts about this species. The same is offered for most every other fish species that you will find included on this clickable map. We always keep this site current and up-to-date, so you can count on that!


How do hunters deal with fleas and ticks?
Question: I’m not a hunter but am wondering if there is a concern for hunters having to deal with fleas and/or ticks jumping off a cooling carcass when field dressing the animal? (Kelly B., Los Angeles)

Answer: Many animals have fleas and ticks and hunters are encouraged to protect themselves from bites by using appropriate sprays or products to reduce the chance of bites and diseases like Lyme disease.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

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