Tag Archives: hunting

How to Fish the Lobster Opener?

California Spiny Lobster (CDFW photo by Derek Stein)

Question: I have some questions about how to best fish the lobster opener. I know that lobster season has a new start time and opens at 6 a.m. on Sept. 30, 2017. If the hoop wet time is a maximum two hours, can I drop my hoops at 4:15 a.m. Sept. 30, 2017 and pull them after the start time of 6 a.m.? (George G.)

Answer: No. Attempting to take lobsters is considered “fishing,” so if you drop your hoop nets before the season officially opens, you will be fishing out of season. The recreational lobster season officially opens at 6 a.m. on the first day of the season. The two hour wet time just means that the net must be checked every two hours once it is legally in the water. So if you legally drop your hoop nets in the water at 6 a.m., they must be serviced by 8 a.m.!

There are also three other new regulations that will go into effect for the 2017-2018 recreational lobster fishing season:

  • Hoop net buoys south of Point Arguello (Santa Barbara County) must now be legibly marked with the operator’s GO ID number for identification and enforcement purposes. Your GO ID number can be found on your sport fishing license and your lobster report card.
  • While diving for crustaceans (including lobsters), divers may be in possession of spearfishing equipment as long as possession of this equipment is otherwise lawful and is not being used to aid in the take of crustaceans (including lobsters).
  • Measuring requirements have been clarified in order to allow for measuring lobster aboard a boat when hoop netting. The change will allow hoop netters to bring spiny lobsters aboard a vessel where they can be measured safely. All lobsters shall be measured immediately and any undersize lobster shall be released immediately into the water. Divers shall measure lobsters while in the water and shall not remove undersized lobsters from the water. Hoop netters may measure lobsters out of the water, but no undersize lobster may be placed in any type of receiver, kept on a person or retained in any person’s possession or under his or her direct control.

These new regulations can be found on pages 36-38 in the 2017-2018 California Saltwater Sport Fishing Regulations booklet available online, at CDFW offices and most tackle shops where fishing licenses are sold.

For more information on the new recreational lobster fishing regulations, please visit our website.


Mouth calls for deer
Question: I am going deer hunting with some friends next week and one of my buddies swears by using deer mouth calls to get their attention. He says they sound like the grunts of bucks during the rut. He says he also sometimes uses predator calls to pique their curiosity. Is it okay to use mouth calls for hunting deer here in California? (Richard T.)

Answer: Yes, as long as the sounds are not generated electronically or amplified.


Record fish caught from private waters
Question: How does the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) handle or verify potential record-sized fish when caught from a private lake requiring catch and release (unharmed) of that species? (Jim Stevens)

Answer: CDFW does not keep records of record fish caught from private waters. For consideration for a State Inland Waters Record, the fish must be taken from a water open to the general public for fishing, and certain verifying procedures must be followed. For more information on how to certify a possible state record fish taken by diving or fishing, please check out our Fishing and Diving Records webpage.


Carrying an additional handgun for protection
Question: I am a California police officer. I was drawn for a G1-C4 Late Season Buck tag. I also have a bear tag. I am planning on hunting with my group. As a sworn law enforcement officer, I am allowed to carry a handgun while off-duty as per my department policy and state law. Can I carry my firearm for defense while hunting? Not to be used for hunting, but in case of a bear or other animal attack. We will be hunting with rifles, but the more I read about hunting, the more I hear about the occasional bear attack. (Brian B.)

Answer: Yes, hunters can carry a handgun in addition to their rifle while hunting during a general season. That said, bear attacks are very uncommon.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Nonlead Shot Required for Eurasian Collared-Doves?

Eurasian Collared-Dove (Creative Commons photo)

Question: I am preparing my gear for the Sept. 1 dove opener and am wondering if I have to use nonlead shot for Eurasian collared-doves since they are a nonnative species with no season or limit? Do I have to carry two types of shells – lead and nonlead – to hunt both mourning doves and Eurasian collared-doves on the opener? Help! I am so confused. (Anonymous)

Answer: Thanks for your question. We’ve received many similar questions in recent days. For the 2017 dove season opening statewide Sept. 1, lead shot is permitted for the taking of Eurasian collared-doves, mourning doves and white-winged doves – as long as you are hunting outside of a state wildlife area or ecological reserve.

California is phasing-in the use of nonlead ammunition for hunting. Until July 1, 2019, doves quail and snipe will not be included in the nonlead shot requirements unless hunting on state wildlife areas or ecological reserves where nonlead shot is required for all hunting.  In addition, hunting programs on military bases now require nonlead for all hunting as well.

You are correct in that the Eurasian collared-dove is a non-native species that can be hunted year-round with no daily bag or possession limit. The Eurasian collared-dove is officially defined as a dove and listed as a game bird under Resident Small Game (California Code of Regulations, section 257) and, like all doves, quail and snipe, can be taken with lead shot. Eurasian collared-doves do not count toward your daily bag and possession limit of mourning and white-winged doves.


Determining creek and river boundaries during closed seasons
Question: When a stream, river or creek is closed year-round or has a closed season, how do you determine the boundary between the closed creek, stream or river, and the river it flows into? Water flows can change on a daily basis depending on dam releases, rain, snowmelt etc. I see the regulation for flows from rivers/creeks into lakes (CCR Title 14, section 1.44). I heard from one person that the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) told them the boundary was 100 yards, but then another person said the boundary extends 300 yards into the creek or stream. For example, the area where Cottonwood Creek or Battle Creek flows into the Sacramento River in Northern California. (Bryan R.)

Answer: Generally, for areas where a creek flows into a river, the term “mouth” or “confluence” is used to describe the boundary or divide between the two bodies of water. For your example, if a person was floating downstream in Battle Creek, once they passed the location where the channel of Battle Creek ends (which is the mouth or confluence), they would be in the Sacramento River. (For a description of the boundary or divide between an area or body of water, go to CCR Title 14, sections 7.00 and 7.50).

The Fish and Game Commission defines “stream” (which includes rivers) for the purpose of hunting and fishing as, “…a body of water that flows at least periodically or intermittently through a bed or channel having banks and supports fish or other aquatic life. This includes watercourses having a surface or subsurface flow that supports or has supported riparian vegetation” (CCR Title 14, section 1.72).


Saltwater use of dead carp
Question: Many lakes want people to catch and remove carp yet they cannot be disposed of on site, and many people do not eat them. I have used cut carp in the Imperial Valley for catfish and it has amazingly tough skin that sometimes has to be cut off the hook. I would like those properties for shark/ray bait when casting into the surf but do not know about the legality of using carp. Can carp be used as chum or bait in saltwater? Their tough skin may also be a plus as a lobster bait. Can carp be used as bait in freshwater? It they could be used as bait, this might encourage people to remove them from our lakes as they then would then have a viable use. (Jim G.)

Answer: There are no regulations that prohibit the use of dead carp as bait in saltwater. However, the use of fish as bait in freshwater is only allowed in certain locations. To find a complete description of where finfish may be used as bait, see CCR Title 14, sections 4.00 through 4.30 found at http://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Inland/2017-Regulations#ch2art3.


Bow hunting during a general season
Question: Is it legal to hunt deer and/or big game in California with a bow during the general season? (Clayton S.)

Answer: Yes, so long as your archery equipment meets the general requirements for “Archery Equipment and Crossbow Regulations” found in the California Mammal Hunting Regulations and CCR Title 14, section 354(c).

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

What’s the Scoop on Razor Clams?

Razor clams (NOAA photo)

Question: I have looked at the regulations for clams and I cannot find a size limit for razor clams. I see the 1-1/2 inch limit for littlenecks, cockles and steamers, but under razor clams there is no size limit given. Do they have a size limit?

I am also very interested in finding more places to clam in Tomales Bay. I know there are no razor clams in Tomales Bay but there sure seems to be a lot of clamming going on there. Do you have any resources that provide specific information on clamming inside the Bay? (Peter C.)

Answer: There is no size limit for razor clams, so the first 20 you dig you should keep regardless of size, especially if their delicate shell has been crushed.

According to California Department of Fish and Wildife (CDFW) Environmental Scientist Christy Juhasz, who works on California’s recreational clam fisheries, razor clams are generally found on open coast, sandy beaches and are more of a coldwater regime species. In fact, California is the southern extent of their geographic range. Because of this, they are not typically found in the warmer and siltier mudflats of inner Tomales Bay.

Recreational razor clamming is popular in the more northern California counties of Del Norte and Humboldt. Since this area constitutes more of their expected home range, clams in this area are potentially more productive but, unfortunately, the fishery has been closed since 2016 due to continued high domoic acid levels (see http://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Health-Advisories).

The fishery is open south of these counties and Juhasz suggests checking out Dillon and Doran beaches in Marin and Sonoma counties, respectively. You may find some available clamming grounds at low tide. Some local clammers have reported though that they have not been able to find razors at their clamming grounds on Doran Beach in recent years. This may be due to the fact that it is the southern region of their range so populations that exist there may not be as productive for a variety of factors (e.g. low recruitment and high fishing pressure.)

Clam and Seal islands in Tomales are popular clamming grounds where most people clam for horseneck/gaper clams and Washington/butter clams. To find these clamming grounds, look for the exposed mudflat areas during low tide just outside of Lawson’s Landing. There is no size limit for these species but the first 10 of each species that you dig, you should keep.


Rock pigeons
Question: While out dove hunting, for years I have also been shooting rock pigeons. People call them by different names like park pigeons, barn pigeons and domestic pigeons, but I am pretty sure they are all the same. Recently, I was told that they are illegal to shoot, but why when there are tons of them, and they taste pretty good, too. Is it legal for me to shoot them, and if so, do I have to use nonlead ammunition? (Mr. Squab)

Answer: According to CDFW Senior Environmental Scientist Karen Fothergill, you are correct that the rock pigeon is also being called by all those other names, but as of July 1, 2017, they are now legal to hunt. Prior to that date there was no regulation specifically allowing for take. The law requires that in order to hunt a particular species, there must be specific laws stating when, how many and method of take. Rock pigeons have been added to the CCR Title 14, section 472 along with starlings and house sparrows. They are classified as a non-game bird and a valid hunting license is required to hunt them. Hunting rock pigeons also requires the use of nonlead ammunition.


Helping grandsons to fish with a two pole license?
Question: If I take my two grandsons fishing, would I be able to fish also if I have a second rod stamp validation? The kids are seven and five years old and would need help from me to fish. (Barry W.)

Answer: You would be able to fish with your two poles as long as you are just assisting your grandsons and not controlling the rod or reeling the fish in for them on your own. You also have to ensure that you are able to closely attend your own two poles. We thank you for taking the time to introduce your grandsons to fishing. We’re pretty sure they will thank you too someday!


Is an abalone gauge/iron combo legal?
Question: When diving for abalone, am I required to carry both a measuring gauge and an abalone iron or can I use a combo device that meets the requirements of both? The dive shop told me they had to be separate tools. (Joon P.)

Answer: Combination devices with fixed (non-moving) opposing arms, capable of measuring abalone accurately that also comply with the requirements for ab irons are legal to use. (See subdivisions (e) and (f) of CCR Title 14, section 29.15.)

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

How to Bring Home Fish Caught Out of State?

(U.S.F.W.S. photo)

Question: Later this year I am planning a trip to fish in the state of Washington. The limits and retention are different. What is the best way to bring fish home from the trip? Is there some paperwork trail that must be kept or some type of certification? (Ross B.)

Answer: Yes. To import fish into California, you are required to complete a declaration of entry form once you reach the California border (Fish and Game Code, section 2353). On this form you will list your fishing license information from Washington, along with the county where the fish were taken. You must deliver one copy of the declaration to the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) entry station, mail one to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and keep one for your records. The declaration of entry provides you the paper trail back to the county and state where the fish were legally harvested.


No deer tag, so what can we hunt?
Question: Half of our group drew tags for our favorite hunting zone and half did not. The unlucky ones will be helping with chores, fishing and hunting coyotes. Can we carry a rifle for coyotes while riding with the hunter with a tag? Many times we’ll drop the deer hunter off and then come back to pick them up, meanwhile calling coyotes as a way to kill the time. Is it legal or would it be best to leave the guns at camp and separate the two activities? (Mark)

Answer: This would be legal as long as the coyote hunters are clearly not attempting to hunt, pursue, catch, capture or kill a deer. If your friends are hunting deer and you are hunting coyotes, it’s best to keep the two practices separate. This is especially true during deer season, so the coyote hunters will not appear to be deer hunting without a tag. In addition, as coyote hunters, you cannot engage in driving deer for your friends to shoot because this is considered “take” of deer. Take is defined as, “Hunt, pursue, catch, capture or kill, or the attempt to hunt pursue, catch, capture or kill” (FGC, section 86). If the coyote hunters are involved in any activity which results in the pursuit of deer, they would be in violation.

Keep in mind that coyote hunting methods are often not compatible with deer hunting, so wildlife officers sometimes encounter hunters claiming to hunt coyotes when in fact they are deer hunting and trying to fill a friend’s tag. This is a significant problem in areas where drawing a tag is difficult, such as the X-1 zone, so the officers are watching for this.


Measuring salmon correctly
Question: Salmon fishing can be challenging because it often entails spending all day on the water, with some days not even getting a legal size fish. I was fishing over the weekend and caught a salmon that when laid flat on the deck measured 23-3/4 inches. If I grabbed it by the tail and held onto it, the fish would measure 24-1/4 inches, making it a legal catch. If a warden had checked me, would it have been a legal catch if I squeezed the tail while the game warden was measuring it? (Ralph C., Santa Cruz)

Answer: Since salmon are measured by their total length, this means measured to the longest length from the tip of the nose to the longest point of the tail. Pinching the tail or stretching the fish using gravity or muscle to find the longest possible length is not permissible. The best way to get the longest length is to lay the fish down flat on a flat surface, pinch the mouth shut and then swing the caudal (tail) fin back and forth until you find the longest point.

Some species, such as tunas, are measured by fork length rather than by total length. This measurement is taken from the tip of the mouth to the length inside the fork of the tail. Minimum and maximum size are defined as, “Tip of the head shall be the most anterior point on the fish with the mouth closed and the fish lying flat on its side” (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 1.62). A diagram showing the correct measurement methods can be found in the 2017-2018 Ocean Sport Fishing Regulations booklet or online.

Keep in mind, fish that are just barely legal can often measure differently between the person’s on deck measuring device and a warden’s device on shore, especially after cleaning/bleeding. I suggest using a bit of caution when keeping a fish that appears to be exactly the legal minimum size as it might come up short when measured later on.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Hunting Over Alfalfa?

Successful pig hunter at Tejon Ranch (CDFW photo)

Question: I know it’s illegal to bait animals to get them to come to you in order to hunt them. However, what about hunting over an alfalfa or corn field? I know some other states allow this and I am wondering if California does, too. (Dakota C.)

Answer: Although feeding big game and hunting over bait is illegal in California, it is legal to hunt over a standing or harvested alfalfa or cornfield. While it is generally prohibited to take resident game birds and mammals from “any area where shelled, shucked or unshucked corn, wheat or other grains, salt, or other feed whatsoever capable of luring, attracting, or enticing such birds or mammals is directly or indirectly placed, exposed, deposited, distributed, or scattered…” (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 257.5), this regulation includes several exceptions. One exception allows the “taking of resident game birds and mammals on or over standing crops, flooded standing crops (including aquatics), flooded harvested croplands, grain crops properly shocked on the field where grown, or grains found scattered solely as the result of normal agricultural planting or harvesting.”


Catch and release in MPA
Question: Is it legal to fish catch and release in a no-take State Marine Conservation Area (SMCA) Marine Protected Area (MPA) such as Big River SMCA? Nothing is mentioned in the California Ocean Sport Fishing Regulations booklet. (Robert J.)

Answer: No, it would not be legal to catch and release inside a no-take SMCA or MPA because “take” means to “hunt, pursue, catch, capture or kill, or attempt to hunt, pursue, catch, capture or kill” (Fish and Game Code, section 86).


Why not able to purchase license and harvest report cards together?
Question: I purchase a California fishing license every December for the following year. Then in May I purchase an abalone report card. And then in September I purchase a lobster report card. I purchase all of these online, which is convenient. Still, it’s three transactions I have to remember and three postage charges. Why can’t I purchase my fishing license and harvest report cards in one transaction? (Ben W.)

Answer: Sport fishing licenses and all sport fishing license items become available for purchase on Nov. 15 each year, except for abalone and lobster report cards. While abalone and lobster report cards are not available for sale at the beginning of the year, you do not have to pay for postage on items purchased through the Online License Sales and Service, unless you select expedited shipping.

Abalone Report Cards become available for purchase on March 15. Abalone regulation changes, based on data gathered from the previous year, frequently require changes to the Abalone Report Card. The March 15 date for the start of sales for Abalone Report Cards allows time for changes to be made to the report card and still allows the report card to be available for purchase 45 days prior to the first day of abalone season. For example, the seasonal limit for abalone recently changed from 18 to 12. Therefore, changes were made within the Automated License Data System to reduce the number of lines printed on the report card and the number of abalone tags included with the report card to 12.

Spiny lobster season spans a part of two calendar years and the report card is valid for the entire lobster season. The upcoming lobster season opens Sept. 30, 2017 and closes March 21, 2018. If Spiny Lobster Report Cards for the 2017/18 season were available at the time 2017 sport fishing licenses first became available for sale (Nov.15, 2016), they would have been available for purchase during the 2016/17 lobster season. It is likely that many people would accidently purchase a spiny lobster report card for the wrong year.


Abalone shell pieces for jewelry?
Question: I realize it is illegal to sell abalone shells as jewelry or other artwork if obtained while sport diving under California regulations, but what if the abalone shells or pieces of them are found while beach combing and the shell had already been vacated by natural means? Can these shells be made into jewelry since there is no limit on taking these shells or pieces? (Scott E., Walnut Creek)

Answer: You can generally pick up abalone shells and shell parts for your personal use. However, Marine Reserves, Marine Protected Areas and other prohibited areas do not allow for any shell collecting. Wherever you go, you should contact the controlling agency to find out what collecting activities are legal for that area. As long as the shells are legally obtained and not sport-taken, they can be used to make jewelry that is sold.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Scouting and Hunting from a Paraglider?

It is illegal to scout for big game via a paraglider because using any device capable of flight in order to locate big game during the hunting season is prohibited. (Creative Commons photo)

Question: Is it legal to scout wild game from a non-motorized paraglider? If so, would it also be legal to locate game from the sky and then land and pursue the animals on foot? (Tony A.)

Answer: For scouting big game, this would be illegal because using any device capable of flight in order to locate big game during the hunting season is prohibited. “No person shall pursue, drive, herd, or take any bird or mammal from any type of motor-driven air or land vehicles…. Additionally, no person shall use any motorized, hot-air or unpowered aircraft or other device capable of flight or any earth orbiting imaging device to locate or assist in locating big game mammals beginning 48 hours before and continuing until 48 hours after any big game hunting season in the same area.” (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 251)


Carp spearfishing in the Russian River?
Question: I’ve been told that even though the Russian River is a salmon spawning river, I would be allowed to spearfish for carp because the carp are invasive. I need to confirm this from the regulation book though. Can you please help? Is this allowed? (Michael S.)

Answer: No. Spearfishing is only allowed in the waters listed under section 2.30 in the 2017 Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations booklet (CCR Title 14, section 2.30) beginning on page 12. In fact, even possessing a spear within 100 yards of the Russian River is unlawful (CCR Title 14, section 2.09).


Upgrading to lifetime fishing license?
Question: I’ve already purchased my 2017 sport fishing license. Can I pay the difference and upgrade to a permanent fishing license? (Bob I.)

Answer: Thank you for your interest in a lifetime license. Unfortunately, annual licenses cannot be upgraded to lifetime licenses mid-year. We suggest that you continue to use your annual license for the remainder of the year and purchase a lifetime license at the end of the year, before the new year to avoid any potential lifetime license fee increases.


How many hooks are allowed when fishing Sabiki rigs?
Question: My question is regarding Sabiki rigs. These pre-made rigs are sold with six hooks, and I have read that we are only allowed to use rigs with a max of three hooks. Does the three-hook rule also apply to Sabiki rigs since these rigs (the small ones with No. 12 hooks) are only for catching bait fish instead of game fish? If so, do I need to cut the rig in half? (Andy S.)

Answer: It depends on where you’re fishing and what you’re fishing for. To catch and keep some species of fish you’re required to use a certain number of hooks. If you catch one of these fish on a rig with more hooks than permitted, you’d have to throw it back.

Many species of rockfish, especially blue rockfish, will bite Sabiki rigs. So, even though they are designed to catch bait, they target any fish species that sees them as food. If you have rockfish, cabezon, greenling or lingcod on your boat, you cannot use a full Sabiki rig and must cut all but two hooks off.

Also, if fishing in inland waters, you would be restricted to using three hooks or less.

And remember, it’s not legal to keep chinook salmon if taken with barbed hooks or if using more than two barbless hooks per line if a salmon is in possession. If you have no fish onboard and are trying to catch bait with a Sabiki rig, you would be required to release any such species.

I suggest that you read the Gear Restrictions section of the annual Ocean Sport Fishing Regulations booklet beginning on page 33, and the Fishing Methods and Gear Restrictions section beginning on page 12 of the annual Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations booklet, to learn more about the regulations of the fish species you expect to encounter.


Maximum number of crab traps allowed per vessel?
Question: We just bought a new boat and would like to start fishing for Dungeness crabs. The sport fishing regulations state that a maximum of 10 hoop nets are allowed for Dungeness crabs per vessel (CCR Title 14, section 29.80). Does this regulation also apply when fishing crab traps south of Point Arena? (Lynard S.)

Answer: No, there are no restrictions on the number of crab traps the average sport crabber can have on a vessel for recreational purposes between Point Arguello, Santa Barbara County and the California-Oregon state line. The same is not true for charter/party boats that take recreational fishermen crabbing. When fishing for Dungeness crabs, the commercial sport fishing boats are restricted to using 60 traps per vessel (CCR Title 14, section 29.85(a)(4)). When fishing south of Point Arguello, hoop nets for crabs are allowed but crab traps are not.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Bait Launching with a DIY Spud Gun?

Pneumatic potato guns that use compressed air are legal as long as they are not used like a weapon (e.g. shot at a person, etc.) (Creative Commons photo)

Question: Is the use of bait launchers legal in California? I have seen many videos and DIY plans showing how to build fishing bait launchers. They look pretty much like a potato gun but are used only for propelling the bait past the surf for a chance at the larger fish. They are made of PVC pipe and filled with air, probably from a bike pump. Its only purpose is for getting the fishing bait out farther than one can cast. I would imagine that certain areas would be opposed to their use, but in general, are these legal to use? (Daniel N.)

Answer: Potato-style guns like you are referring to are legal under federal law. However, under state law, potato guns that use combustion (instead of compressed air) to launch the projectile are “firearms,” and one with a bore of over 0.5 inches is a destructive device.

Pneumatic potato guns that use compressed air are legal as long as they are not used like a weapon (e.g. shot at a person, etc.), so this line launching device would be legal under state and federal laws. However, you should check for local city and county ordinances because some local governments prohibit use of any devices that propel projectiles. If you intend to use this line launching device on a state beach, you may also want to consult State Parks. And if you plan to use it to fish within a National Marine Sanctuary, I suggest you check in with that Sanctuary office to be sure they do not prohibit these types of devices.

As far as using it to cast a fishing line, nothing in the Fish and Game Code or its implementing regulations prohibit using this compressed air launcher as long as the fishing line remains attached to a rod and reel, or the person is brave enough to hold the other end of line in their hands!


Catching crabs both inside and outside San Francisco Bay
Question: Let’s say I’m in the ocean at Baker Beach in San Francisco and I catch a Dungeness crab. Then I want to go fishing and crabbing nearby at Ft. Point Pier (just inside the bay) or Aquatic Park. Basically, I don’t want to leave my crabs in the car for hours, and I have one bucket with an aquarium pump to keep all the crabs in. Can I bring the bucket with the crab onto that pier or will a California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) warden presume I caught it there? And similarly, would leaving it in the parked car be allowed or would they presume it was from that area? (Fred D.)

Answer: “Dungeness crab may not be taken from or possessed if taken from San Francisco Bay and San Pablo Bay, plus all their tidal bays, sloughs and estuaries between the Golden Gate Bridge and Carquinez Bridge” (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 29.85(a)).

Based upon the scenario you describe of having Dungeness crabs in possession in a prohibited area, you could get into trouble if you have Dungeness crabs on the pier with you or while returning from a prohibited area with fishing equipment. As per Fish and Game Code, section 2000(b): Possession of a bird, mammal, fish, reptile, amphibian, or part of any of those animals, in or on the fields, forests, or waters of this state, or while returning therefrom with fishing or hunting equipment, is prima facie evidence the possessor took the bird, mammal, fish, reptile, or amphibian, or part of that animal.

CDFW recommends that you first fish in the more restrictive area (the Bay), then move outside the Bay to fish for Dungeness crab to avoid any misunderstandings or extra scrutiny by wildlife officers. But, what you describe is not prohibited, and experienced local wildlife officers will be able to tell the difference between freshly caught crab and those that have been in your bucket for hours.


Transporting a compound bow
Question: What are the requirements to legally transport a compound bow? (Antoine R.)

Answer: “No person may nock or fit the notch in the end of an arrow to a bowstring or crossbow string in a ready-to-fire positon while in or on any vehicle” (CCR Title 14, section 354(i)).


Lost fishing license
Question: I purchased a fishing license a couple of months ago but now cannot find it. I do have a picture of it. How can I get a copy of my original? (Dee D.)

Answer: Go to any License Agent or CDFW License Sales Office to buy a duplicate sport fishing license. A small fee is charged for each duplicate validation. If you lose your Abalone Report Card or Sturgeon Fishing Report Card, you can obtain a duplicate from CDFW license sales offices only. You must complete an Abalone Report Card Affidavit (PDF Form) and pay the duplicate fee to replace an Abalone Report Card. You must complete a Sturgeon Fishing Report Card Affidavit (PDF Form) and pay the duplicate fee to replace a Sturgeon Fishing Report Card. Duplicate fees are listed on the license description page.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.