Tag Archives: nuisance wildlife

Nonlead Shot Required for Eurasian Collared-Doves?

Eurasian Collared-Dove (Creative Commons photo)

Question: I am preparing my gear for the Sept. 1 dove opener and am wondering if I have to use nonlead shot for Eurasian collared-doves since they are a nonnative species with no season or limit? Do I have to carry two types of shells – lead and nonlead – to hunt both mourning doves and Eurasian collared-doves on the opener? Help! I am so confused. (Anonymous)

Answer: Thanks for your question. We’ve received many similar questions in recent days. For the 2017 dove season opening statewide Sept. 1, lead shot is permitted for the taking of Eurasian collared-doves, mourning doves and white-winged doves – as long as you are hunting outside of a state wildlife area or ecological reserve.

California is phasing-in the use of nonlead ammunition for hunting. Until July 1, 2019, doves quail and snipe will not be included in the nonlead shot requirements unless hunting on state wildlife areas or ecological reserves where nonlead shot is required for all hunting.  In addition, hunting programs on military bases now require nonlead for all hunting as well.

You are correct in that the Eurasian collared-dove is a non-native species that can be hunted year-round with no daily bag or possession limit. The Eurasian collared-dove is officially defined as a dove and listed as a game bird under Resident Small Game (California Code of Regulations, section 257) and, like all doves, quail and snipe, can be taken with lead shot. Eurasian collared-doves do not count toward your daily bag and possession limit of mourning and white-winged doves.


Determining creek and river boundaries during closed seasons
Question: When a stream, river or creek is closed year-round or has a closed season, how do you determine the boundary between the closed creek, stream or river, and the river it flows into? Water flows can change on a daily basis depending on dam releases, rain, snowmelt etc. I see the regulation for flows from rivers/creeks into lakes (CCR Title 14, section 1.44). I heard from one person that the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) told them the boundary was 100 yards, but then another person said the boundary extends 300 yards into the creek or stream. For example, the area where Cottonwood Creek or Battle Creek flows into the Sacramento River in Northern California. (Bryan R.)

Answer: Generally, for areas where a creek flows into a river, the term “mouth” or “confluence” is used to describe the boundary or divide between the two bodies of water. For your example, if a person was floating downstream in Battle Creek, once they passed the location where the channel of Battle Creek ends (which is the mouth or confluence), they would be in the Sacramento River. (For a description of the boundary or divide between an area or body of water, go to CCR Title 14, sections 7.00 and 7.50).

The Fish and Game Commission defines “stream” (which includes rivers) for the purpose of hunting and fishing as, “…a body of water that flows at least periodically or intermittently through a bed or channel having banks and supports fish or other aquatic life. This includes watercourses having a surface or subsurface flow that supports or has supported riparian vegetation” (CCR Title 14, section 1.72).


Saltwater use of dead carp
Question: Many lakes want people to catch and remove carp yet they cannot be disposed of on site, and many people do not eat them. I have used cut carp in the Imperial Valley for catfish and it has amazingly tough skin that sometimes has to be cut off the hook. I would like those properties for shark/ray bait when casting into the surf but do not know about the legality of using carp. Can carp be used as chum or bait in saltwater? Their tough skin may also be a plus as a lobster bait. Can carp be used as bait in freshwater? It they could be used as bait, this might encourage people to remove them from our lakes as they then would then have a viable use. (Jim G.)

Answer: There are no regulations that prohibit the use of dead carp as bait in saltwater. However, the use of fish as bait in freshwater is only allowed in certain locations. To find a complete description of where finfish may be used as bait, see CCR Title 14, sections 4.00 through 4.30 found at http://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Inland/2017-Regulations#ch2art3.


Bow hunting during a general season
Question: Is it legal to hunt deer and/or big game in California with a bow during the general season? (Clayton S.)

Answer: Yes, so long as your archery equipment meets the general requirements for “Archery Equipment and Crossbow Regulations” found in the California Mammal Hunting Regulations and CCR Title 14, section 354(c).

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Fishing for Black Bass after Catching a Limit of Stripers?

Striped Bass (Photo courtesy of Ken Oda)

Question: My buddies and I do a fair amount of striper fishing and seem to always debate this question. Am I allowed to keep fishing after keeping a limit of stripers as long as I am fishing for largemouth/smallmouth bass instead? The techniques are similar, so I’m wondering if we could be cited. (Brett M.)

Answer: After catching your limit of striped bass, you can continue fishing for largemouth and smallmouth bass. However, once you have made this switch, you must make sure to immediately release any accidentally caught stripers.


Collecting a road-killed opossum?
Question: I saw an opossum dead on the side of the road yesterday, not playing possum (it was actually dead). I wanted to take it home to keep the bones but I left it there untouched because I didn’t know what the law on collecting was. If I find an animal like that again, can I take it home and process it? If I can’t, is there someone I can talk to who might allow me to keep the bones after the state processes it? (Rachael)

Answer: Road-killed wildlife may not be possessed. “The accidental taking of a bird, mammal, reptile, or amphibian by collision with a motor vehicle while the vehicle is being operated on a road or highway is not a violation of this code” (Fish and Game Commission, section 2000.5). This means it is not illegal to accidentally kill the animal, however, the Fish and Game Code does not authorize possession of wildlife accidentally killed in vehicle collisions. Opossum are classified as non-game mammals that may be hunted with a hunting license (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 472(a)). The only way for you to legally possess them would be to hunt them or to obtain a scientific collecting permit, if your collection purposes are for scientific research purposes.


Illegal animal imports?
Question: A while back I saw the reply in your column regarding the legality of buying/selling python snake skin. I see kangaroo on the prohibited list. Does this include all species? As I understand it, the Australian government allows the cull of Marcropus giganteus due to gross overpopulation. (Steve B.)

Answer: Yes. California Penal Code section 653o includes all species of kangaroo and provides that it “is unlawful to import into this state for commercial purposes, to possess with intent to sell, or to sell within the state, the dead body, or any part or product thereof, of a polar bear, leopard, ocelot, tiger, cheetah, jaguar, sable antelope, wolf (Canis lupus), zebra, whale, cobra, python, sea turtle, colobus monkey, kangaroo, vicuna, sea otter, free-roaming feral horse, dolphin or porpoise (Delphinidae), Spanish lynx, or elephant.”


Where can to use two rods in San Francisco Bay?
Question: I’m a little confused about the rules on using two rods when fishing San Francisco Bay. The rules state, “While fishing from the shore in San Francisco and San Pablo bays between the Golden Gate Bridge and the west Carquinez Bridge, you may only use one line with no more than three hooks; you may also use an unlimited number of crab traps. Species-specific gear restrictions (such as for rockfish, lingcod and salmon) do apply when fishing from the shore.”

So, if I’m fishing from Alameda, can I use two rods? The rule says only from between Golden Gate to Carquinez Bridge. Alameda is to the east of the Golden Gate but I’m fishing from the shore in San Francisco Bay. Please let me know. (San S., Alameda)

Answer: The answer to your question is no, but you’ve asked an excellent question. There is a section in our regulations (CCR Title 14, section 27.00) that defines the waters of San Francisco Bay. The waters off Alameda are part of San Francisco Bay pursuant to this definition. This section, as recently amended, includes the following definition:

“The Ocean and San Francisco Bay District consists of the Ocean and San Francisco Bay, as described herein. The Ocean is the open seas adjacent to the coast and islands and the waters of open or enclosed bays contiguous to the ocean, including the waters of Elkhorn Slough, west of Elkhorn Road between Castroville and Watsonville. San Francisco Bay is the waters of San Francisco and San Pablo bays plus all their tidal bays, sloughs, estuaries, and tidal portions of their rivers and streams between the Golden Gate Bridge and the west Carquinez Bridge. …”.

In the San Francisco Bay (as defined above), “only one line with not more than three hooks may be used” (CCR Title 14, section 28.65(a)).

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Backyard Dove Hunting with Judo Point Arrows?

Eurasian Collared Dove (Creative Commons photo)

Question: I am a recently minted homeowner and my neighborhood is overrun by Eurasian doves. For fun, I would like to do some recurve bow hunting for them with judo point arrows when the season opens later this year. I know that the statute states, “No discharge of firearms or any deadly weapon within 150 yards of a residence.” However, can you please tell me if using judo point arrows with flu-flu fletching would be considered deadly? My plan is to hunt from an elevated position such that the arrows strike within my own backyard. (Anonymous)

Answer: Because you would be hunting, the statute would apply to you even if your bow and arrows were not deadly weapons. “It is unlawful for a person, other than the owner, person in possession of the premises, or a person having the express permission of the owner or person in possession of the premises, while within 150 yards of an occupied dwelling house, residence, or other building…, to either hunt or discharge a firearm or other deadly weapon while hunting” (Fish and Game Code, section 3004(a)). To lawfully hunt in your back yard, you would need to get permission from every owner or occupant of dwellings within 150 yards, and then make sure there are no local ordinances or rules that prohibit hunting in your neighborhood, and then make sure your archery equipment complies with California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 354. You will find this section if you go to page 28 in the current California Mammal Hunting Regulations booklet.


Obtaining gaper clams?
Question: I have a question regarding digging for and obtaining gaper clams. I know the daily bag limit is 10 clams per person. Now, I’m pretty sure you know how hard it is to dig for these clams, so if I’m clamming with my friends, can we assist each other to reach our limits? I’m confused because last year while with friends digging for clams, we were checked by a Fish and Wildlife officer. He just checked our licenses, counted the total quantity that my friends and I had acquired and then sent us on our way. However, this year I heard you can’t help each other. Did they change the regulation or was it always that way? I would hate to get a ticket due to ignorance. (Nam T.)

Answer: As long as all of you were in possession of valid fishing licenses, it would be permissible to help each other as long as each person is retrieving their own clams and each person is involved in the entire process of digging for their own clams. Where you could run into a problem is if one person digs up and retrieves more than 10 clams and “shares” his additional catch among the group. Once a person has dug up and possesses a daily bag limit, he or she must stop assisting other members of the group. This is important because if the individual possesses a limit, he or she is no longer able to attempt to take any more.

Before setting out to harvest gaper clams or any other species of shellfish, please first check the California Department of Public Heath shellfish hotline at (800) 553-4133. This recording is available 24/7, is updated frequently and will tell you about any health concerns or health-related harvest closures in effect for shellfish and finfish in California ocean waters.


Fishing with live bait in Lake Mendocino?
Question: Can I buy minnows in Lake County (Clearlake Outdoors) and then use them as bait in Lake Mendocino? I have tried to read the regs but they are soooo confusing. (William W.)

Answer: Remember, the term “minnows” is used for a number of baitfish species. Golden shiner, fathead minnow, red shiner, mosquitofish, longjaw mudsucker and staghorn sculpin are authorized live bait for Lake Mendocino. The regulations you are asking about can be found in the 2017 Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations booklet under CCR Title 14, section 4.25.


Kelp collecting for a science class?
Question: I am a science teacher planning a unit on photosynthesis, and I’d like to include a few pieces of kelp in the kids’ exploratory activities. They’ll be looking at leaves and at other aquatic algae, too. Before I go collecting, is it even legal to go get some kelp fronds from the beach wrack? If so, where it is legal to collect? (Kelly T., Pacific Grove)

Answer: Take of kelp is legal, as long as you’re not in a Marine Protected Area (MPA) that prohibits the take of kelp. The daily bag limit for recreational harvesters of marine algae is 10 pounds wet weight in the aggregate. Recreational harvesters are prohibited from harvesting or disturbing eelgrass (Zostera species), surfgrass (Phyllospadix species) and sea palm (Postelsia palmaeformis).

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Are Green Lobsters Safe to Eat?

(CDFW photo by Derek Stein)


Question: A buddy of mine got two lobsters in San Diego Bay right before the season closed. While he was cleaning them, he noticed green algae on their shells and then found the meat to be white, looking like it was already cooked. Both lobsters were still alive when detailing them. Have you heard any other stories like this? Would they have still been okay to cook and eat? (Ray C., San Diego)

Answer: When you find a lobster with algae on its shell (exoskeleton) it usually means it hasn’t molted in quite a while. This should be nothing to worry about, though. An animal getting ready to molt pulls salts out of its existing shell and creates a soft exoskeleton underneath that will expand with water and salts once the animal molts. Our best guess is that the old exoskeleton may have been overgrown and what your friend encountered (white, cooked-looking meat) could have been the new exoskeleton just under the old. As long as the animal was acting normally and was still alive before it was cooked, there was likely no problem with the meat.

One test seafood businesses use when cooking whole lobsters is whether they curl. The shell should turn to a darker red color and the tail tends to curl (not tightly, but it’s difficult to lay the animal flat). If there’s no curl, discard the animal.


Trapping opossums?
Question: My city neighbor is now renting a home and has taken it upon himself to trap local opossums and release them elsewhere. He says he is taking them to a county road (Dry Creek) but there is no way to verify this. We have lived in our home for 15 years and so we, along with our neighbors, are concerned. We have lived with the possums and raccoons for a lot of years without issues. This tenant intends to exterminate them. Is there anything we can do? (Tyler)

Answer: “All furbearing and nongame mammals that are legal to trap must be immediately euthanized or released” (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 465.5(g)(1)). So it is not legal to transport opossums elsewhere for release. Possums should not be “relocated” from where they were trapped for many reasons, the most important being to prevent the spread of disease, and immediately releasing the opossums would not take care of the “pest” problem that your neighbor probably wants to solve. There are other options that you could inform your neighbor about though. “Keep me Wild” is a campaign that strives to limit conflicts between wild animals and humans. More information about how your neighbor can avoid problems with opossums may be found at the Keep Me Wild website.


Python skins to make leather goods?
Question: I’m a fashion designer located in New Jersey and I am looking to move my business to California. I’ve heard and read things about Python skin being illegal in California. I was looking for more information on this and whether this is 100 percent true? I currently make leather goods, but with exotic skins. (Michael S.)

Answer: Pythons are on the list of animals, or parts or products thereof, that are illegal to import into this state for commercial purposes, to possess with intent to sell, or to sell within the state (see California Penal Code, section 653o.) Prohibited species include: polar bears, leopards, ocelots, tigers, cheetahs, jaguars, sable antelope, wolves (Canis lupus), zebras, whales, cobras, pythons, sea turtles, colobus monkeys, kangaroos, vicunas, sea otters, free-roaming feral horses, dolphins or porpoises (Delphinidae), Spanish lynxes or elephants.


Fishing with kids and friends
Question: I am taking my daughter and a couple of friends and their dads on our boat this weekend. The girls are all under 16. I have a license but do all of the dads need them, too? Or, can I be the only adult angler? (Eric N.)

Answer: As long as the non-licensed adults on the boat do not assist in any way with fishing, they do not need to have a sport fishing license to ride along with you on your fishing trip. “Every person 16 years of age or older who takes any fish, reptile or amphibian for any purpose other than profit shall first obtain a valid license for that purpose and shall have that license on his or her person or in his or her immediate possession or where otherwise specifically required by law or regulation to be kept when engaged in carrying out any activity authorized by the license” (Fish and Game Code, section 7145).

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Bird Feeders May Lure Other Unwanted Wildlife Visitors

than you’d

Wild bird feeders often lure in more than just the intended birds (Creative Commons photo)

Wild bird feeders may be a lure for a lot more unintended wildlife visitors than you’d expect (Photo courtesy of Creative Commons)

Question: Is it okay in California to put bird feeders out to feed wild birds? Assuming it is, if we observe deer eating the seeds intended for birds, are we obligated to remove the bird seed and stop feeding the birds or can we continue to put out seeds for the birds even if the deer are also coming in to consume it? (Mark M.)

Answer: Wild bird feeders are legal to use, but keep in mind that you don’t want the birds to become completely dependent on this artificial food source. If they do become dependent, then if/when this artificial food source becomes unavailable, the birds may have trouble going back to find a natural food source to sustain them.

Which leads into your second question … if you find that the deer are changing their behavior and coming onto your property in pursuit of any spilled bird seed, you should stop feeding the birds until the deer stop coming in. Pretty soon there won’t be any birds, just deer standing around waiting for their handout. It’s either that or move the feeder to a spot the deer can’t get to. It’s never a good idea to start feeding deer.

Another potential problem is that bird feeders can also be a big attractant for black bears who are trying to consume enough calories to support hibernation during winter months when natural food is scarce. The suet (animal fat) used to hold bird seed together in many products is also a dense calorie source which bears can become dependent upon. Knowingly attracting bears with this food source, which can be considered bait, is a citable offense.

Keep in mind, it’s illegal to feed big game (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 251.3) and unlawful to harass wildlife (causing them to alter their normal behavior). Harassment can include feeding (CCR Title 14, section 251), even if it’s via bird feeders.


Spiny lobster hoop net buoy regs
Question: I read where crab traps need the owner’s GO ID number on the buoys this year. Is this required for lobster hoop nets as well? I did not see it but the locker room lawyers I hang with say the requirement applies to both. (Joe H.)

Answer: For this season, that is not the case. Beginning with the 2017 season, however, this will be required unless the hoop net is deployed from shore. You can get a preview of the adopted regulation changes for sport lobster fishing on the California Fish and Game Commission website.

“Beginning on April 1, 2017, hoop nets used south of Point Arguello shall be marked with a surface buoy. The surface buoy shall be legibly marked to identify the operator’s GO ID number as stated on the operator’s sport fishing license or lobster report card. Hoop nets deployed from persons on shore and manmade structures connected to the shore are not required to be marked with a surface buoy.”


Bear tag on my body?
Question: I have a question about bear hunting. This past season while in camp and talking to wildlife officers , a big bear walked by about 100 yards away. I was about to shoot it when I remembered my tag was in my trailer and not on my body. I got the tag first, then contained my dog, but by then the bear was gone. I could have shot him but didn’t have the tag on me. Did I just save myself a ticket for shooting without my tag in possession or did I just miss the bear? It says on the tag that it must be in immediate possession while hunting. (Rick W.)

Answer: Because you were at your camp and not hunting at the time, you are not expected to have your tag/license on you. However, according to Fish and Game Code, section 4753, “The person to whom a bear tag has been issued shall carry the tag while hunting bear.” So, you did the right thing. Once you would have picked up your firearm, you would have been actively hunting, so therefore required to carry your tag. Also keep in mind that if you were in a designated campground area, many campgrounds have safety zones around them where shooting is not allowed.


Trout fishing at night
Question: Can you clarify the exact rules for trout fishing at night? The regulations aren’t very clear to me when I read them. (Brandon C.)

Answer: In most cases, trout and salmon may not be taken at night. However, some exceptions can be found in the 2016-2017 Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations handbook on page 16 under CCR Title 14, section 3.00. Night is defined as one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise.


Mouth calls for deer
Question: My question goes back to deer season. I am wondering if it is ok to use mouth calls for deer hunting here in California. I have found this legal to do in other states. (Richard T.)

Answer: Yes, you can use mouth calls for deer as long as the sounds are not electronically generated or electronically amplified (FGC, section 3012).

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Importing native snakes to control ground squirrels?

California Ground Squirrel (USFWS photo)

California Ground Squirrel (USFWS photo)

Question: We have a small orange grove in Ventura County that has been overrun by ground squirrels in the past few years. Is there any legal method of “importing” king snakes or gopher snakes onto our property to help control the squirrel population? (Darrell J., Ventura County)

Answer: Unfortunately, we don’t allow the release or relocation of snakes into the wild without specific authorization, and at this time we do not allow it for bio-control such as you are requesting. According to CDFW Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Policy Coordinator Laura Patterson, “We’d have to evaluate what else they may eat that could be sensitive, make sure they’re disease-free and that they are genetically similar to the local snakes.”

If the property where you live is hospitable, we’d assume you have gopher and king snakes there already. However, if they’re not currently there, perhaps the site is just not suitable for them. These snakes naturally occur in most places where the habitat and prey sources can support their survival.

The only circumstances in which we might allow snakes to be relocated would be if there was a development nearby, and the snakes would otherwise be killed by construction. In a case like this, we might allow them to be relocated to another property nearby.


Hunting on property not posted with “No Hunting” signs?
Question: Can I hunt on property that is fenced but not posted with “No Hunting” signs without specific permission from the landowner? (Anonymous)

Answer: No, it is unlawful to trespass onto fenced property for the purpose of discharging any firearm or taking birds or mammals without the written permission of the landowner or other authorized person.

Fish and Game Code regulations specifically state that if property is owned by another person and is either under cultivation or enclosed by a fence, you need written permission (Fish and Game Code, section 2016). This law also applies to land that is not fenced or under cultivation but is posted with no trespassing or no hunting signs. A simple guideline is to respect crops, fences and signs, and in any other circumstance that makes you wonder about hunter access, seek out the landowner and ask for permission. In cases involving publicly owned property (game refuges, state wildlife areas, etc.), specific written permission may or may not be required.


Sea urchin sport harvesting?
Question: I’m looking for confirmation regarding the recreational take of sea urchins. Is it correct that they can be taken with a California sport fishing license as long as they are not taken in marine protected areas? Also, that the daily limit is 35 urchins and size does not matter so I will not be required to carry a measuring gauge like with abalone diving? Is all of this correct? (Dan L.)

Answer: Yes to all above. Sea urchins are legal to take in California with a sport fishing license. The season is open year-round for all species of urchin. The limit is 35 urchins per day/in possession and there is no size limit (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 29.05). Sea urchins can be taken only on hook and line or with the hands (CCR Title 14, section 29.10). These regulations can be found in the Ocean Sport Fishing Regulations booklet, along with the marine protected areas in California that are closed to the take of sea urchins.


Why can’t hunters buy extra preference points?
Question: I’ve noticed in other states that hunters are allowed to buy preference points. Why can’t hunters in California buy extra preference points like elsewhere? (Noel)

Answer: The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) does allow hunters who do not wish to apply for a premium hunt in a specific year to essentially “buy” a preference point by applying in the drawings for a preference point. These are only for deer, elk, antelope or bighorn sheep. Hunters can only obtain one point per year and cannot obtain points for previous years in which they did not apply.

According to Tony Straw from CDFW’s Automated License Data System Unit, CDFW’s Modified Preference Point System was established to reward persistent, unsuccessful applicants and provide a predictability of when a hunter will be drawn for their premium hunt choice, while still providing some opportunity for new hunters.

If a system of “buying extra preference points” was implemented, it would remove the predictability of winning a premium hunt because the number of hunters at the various point values would be inconsistent each year (it would depend upon the number of hunters purchasing additional points). Additionally, the advantage gained by a hunter who consistently applied without success over the years would be significantly reduced in a single year as other hunters at lesser point values purchased additional points.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

Spearfishing for White Seabass

Kirby Morejohn and Garo Hachigian_photo by Kirby Morejohn)

Large white seabass taken by spear fishermen Kirby Morejohn and Garo Hachigian (Photo by Kirby Morejohn)

Question: It’s been an ongoing debate among our small spearfishing group and it’s time to ask the authorities. When spearfishing from a boat, if a diver reaches his maximum limit of three white seabass (WSB) for the day and then gifts one of his fish to somebody who does not have a fish, can the person who caught the fish hunt for one more WSB since he now only has two in his possession? (Chester L.)

Answer: No, each spear fisherman (or angler) is allowed to catch and keep up to three white seabass per day, period. If a fisherman chooses to give one away, that’s fine, but they cannot then continue to try to catch another to refill their personal bag limit for the day. That spear fisherman would have to wait until the next day, and if they still had their two WSB in possession, they would only be able to catch one more the next day because three WSB is both the daily bag limit and the possession limit.

There are a couple of exceptions here, though. Anglers/divers who will be out to sea for multiple days can get a multi-day fishing permit that will allow them to keep up to three limits of WSB over three days if they have secured this permit prior to their trip and followed all of the associated regulations under California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 27.15. There is also a one-fish limit between March 15 and June 15 for the take of white seabass south of Point Conception.


Finishing hunt after legal hunting hours?
Question: I hunt with a bow and on some occasions will shoot my game right at sundown and then have to chase my animal sometimes for an hour or more. And then when I find it, I may have to shoot it again. Is it legal to finish off an animal after dark if it was shot during the legal hunting hours? (Geoff M., Camarillo)

Answer: No. Authorized hunting and shooting hours are clearly stated in the regulations as running from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset (CCR Title 14, sections 310, 310.5 and 352). To shoot an animal outside of those authorized hours is illegal.

Whenever possible, try to plan your hunt so that you will not be pushing the envelope right at the end of hunt hours and can leave ample time to track and retrieve the animal during legal hours.


Shooting aggressive ravens?
Question: What are the restrictions on shooting ravens in California? I have personally witnessed ravens killing baby chukar and baby red-tailed hawks. At my home they raid my chickens and steal the eggs. They like to sit on a pole where the remnants of their kill ends up on the ground, including a variety of egg shell bits and baby desert tortoise shells. I have also seen a group of ravens attempting to kill a cat. I know that they became protected at one time, but what is the status now? Can I shoot the ones on and around my property? (David C.)

Answer: No. Ravens, Corvus corax, are protected by both California (Fish and Game Code, section 3513) and federal laws (Title 50-CFR). Ravens may not be taken in California except under the authority of a permit issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). For more information regarding the availability of permits, please check the USFWS Permits website.


Transporting overlimits?
Question: Can I transport an overlimit of fish carcasses to the dump? For example, three peoples’ fish limits are cleaned at a home location. Then, one person pulls the short straw and gets stuck having to take the combined carcasses by vehicle to the dump. I can see how if they were stopped by law enforcement and they had an overlimit of three peoples’ carcasses carried by one person, an explanation stating that person was dumping three legal limits of carcasses may or may not fly with a warden. Can you please provide some clarity? (Trevor L.)

Answer: The department recommends that the person transporting the carcasses have copies of each person’s fishing licenses, or at least their names and contact information in case the transport and disposal of more than one person’s limit comes into question.

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Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Please contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.